Development, Education

Backpropagation Tutorial

The PhD thesis of Paul J. Werbos at Harvard in 1974 described backpropagation as a method of teaching feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANNs). In the words of Wikipedia, it lead to a "rennaisance" in the ANN research in 1980s.

As we will see later, it is an extremely straightforward technique, yet most of the tutorials online seem to skip a fair amount of details. Here's a simple (yet still thorough and mathematical) tutorial of how backpropagation works from the ground-up; together with a couple of example applets. Feel free to play with them (and watch the videos) to get a better understanding of the methods described below!

Training a single perceptron

Training a multilayer neural network

1. Background

To start with, imagine that you have gathered some empirical data relevant to the situation that you are trying to predict - be it fluctuations in the stock market, chances that a tumour is benign, likelihood that the picture that you are seeing is a face or (like in the applets above) the coordinates of red and blue points.

We will call this data training examples and we will describe ith training example as a tuple (\vec{x_i}, y_i), where \vec{x_i} \in \mathbb{R}^n is a vector of inputs and y_i \in \mathbb{R} is the observed output.

Ideally, our neural network should output y_i when given \vec{x_i} as an input. In case that does not always happen, let's define the error measure as a simple squared distance between the actual observed output and the prediction of the neural network: E := \sum_i (h(\vec{x_i}) - y_i)^2, where h(\vec{x_i}) is the output of the network.

2. Perceptrons (building-blocks)

The simplest classifiers out of which we will build our neural network are perceptrons (fancy name thanks to Frank Rosenblatt). In reality, a perceptron is a plain-vanilla linear classifier which takes a number of inputs a_1, ..., a_n, scales them using some weights w_1, ..., w_n, adds them all up (together with some bias b) and feeds everything through an activation function \sigma \in \mathbb{R} \rightarrow \mathbb{R}.

A picture is worth a thousand equations:

Perceptron (linear classifier)

Perceptron (linear classifier)

To slightly simplify the equations, define w_0 := b and a_0 := 1. Then the behaviour of the perceptron can be described as \sigma(\vec{a} \cdot \vec{w}), where \vec{a} := (a_0, a_1, ..., a_n) and \vec{w} := (w_0, w_1, ..., w_n).

To complete our definition, here are a few examples of typical activation functions:

  • sigmoid: \sigma(x) = \frac{1}{1 + \exp(-x)},
  • hyperbolic tangent: \sigma(x) = \tanh(x),
  • plain linear \sigma(x) = x and so on.

Now we can finally start building neural networks. Continue reading

 
1099 Kudos
Don't
move!